jm.toflyintheworld.com
New recipes

Celery Root, Kohlrabi, and Apple Purée

Celery Root, Kohlrabi, and Apple Purée


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Ingredients

  • 2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 3/4” cubes
  • 1 1/2 pounds kohlrabi, peeled, cut into 1/2” cubes
  • 1 pound russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 1” cubes
  • 1 Granny Smith apple (1/2 lb.), peeled, cored, cut into 1” cubes
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Add celery root to a large pot of boiling salted water. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until tender, 11–13 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer celery root to a large bowl. Return water to a boil; repeat with kohlrabi, then potatoes, cooking each separately until tender, 14–16 minutes for kohlrabi and 10–12 minutes for potatoes; add to bowl with celery root.

  • Meanwhile, bring apple and 2 Tbsp. water to a boil in a small saucepan. Cover and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until apple falls apart, 6–8 minutes, adding water by tablespoons if dry.

  • Working in batches, pass celery root, kohlrabi, potatoes, and apples through a potato ricer into a large bowl. Pass mixture through ricer again if a smoother texture is desired. Stir in butter. Season with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Transfer to a microwave-safe bowl, cover, and chill. Rewarm in microwave in 30-second intervals until heated through. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Garnish with chervil sprigs.

,Photos by Christopher TestaniReviews Section

Kohlrabi: 4 Easy Ways

Kohlrabi is likely one of those vegetables that you hadn't met before your Fresh Fork days, but it is an incredibly tasty and versatile veggie. After you've peeled the thick outside layer off, try one of these 4 variations on preparing it!

Preheat your oven to 450 degrees. Remove the root end, leaves, and peel/slice off the thick outer

layer to expose the inner flesh. Dice the kohlrabi into approximately 1/2" inch pieces.

Toss the diced kohlrabi with olive oil, garlic, and salt. Add some coarsely chopped onion pieces if you like, half way thru roasting. Roast in a roasting pan (not a cookie sheet, needs sides) so that you may toss them over every now and then. You want to cook them until the bottom starts to stick then toss and repeat. It will take about 45 minutes to cook.

After you remove them from the oven, drizzle with balsamic vinegar and serve warm.

In a thick bottomed skillet, cook diced kohlrabi with butter. As the kohlrabi starts to brown a bit (5 minutes or so), add some onions. Season with salt and pepper and cook until kohlrabi is tender, about 20 to 30 minutes depending on heat. Toss regularly.

For a creamy sauce, dust 1 tbsp of flour over the cooking kohlrabi. Then pour in the cream or milk three quarters cup of milk. Stir until the milk thickens. Serve warm.

Peel the kohlrabi. Shred it on a box grater and mix with shredded apple. Use a ratio of about 2/3 kohlrabi to 1/3 apple. Toss with either just apple cider vinegar or for a creamier slaw, try cream, mustard, and a little vinegar. Add onion and parsley (if you like) and season with salt and pepper. Chill one hour or up to overnight. Serve chilled, and goes great with pork and BBQ.

Sweat the mirepoix (carrot, celery, onion) with some butter over very low heat in a covered pan and give it about 15-20 minutes. About halfway through, add the thyme and the bayleaf. Check occasionally to make sure they are not browning, but softening.

Add peeled, sliced kohlrabi, and then start adding in warmed chicken or veggie stock to cover the veggies (you might only need 2.5-3.5 cups, reserve some stock in case you want it thinner), and simmer. When the veggies are very soft, remove the bay leaf and purée the soup using an immersion blender, in an upright blender or using a food mill.

Season the soup with salt and pepper, and hit the soup with some cream if you want a thicker, creamier texture.


A Classic, Revisited

Since 1936, Oliver&rsquos has captivated Buffalo&rsquos dining denizens thanks to a steady stream of extraordinary talent in the kitchen. Now, after a recent renovation and revamped menu by Nickel City rising star Ross Warhol, this culinary landmark continues to shine through sophisticated, artfully presented plates.

Click here to view photos from the event.

Hors d&rsquoOeuvre

Chicken Liver Toasts with Shaved Celery, Red Grapes, Ramson Capers, Chicken Skin, and Chervil

Oysters with Celery Gin, Black Currants, Spirulina, and Lemon Balm

Mushroom Tortellini with Pickled Kohlrabi, Foie Gras Demi-Glace, Truffles, and Nasturtium

Blue Cheesecake Tarts with Concord Grapes, Walnuts, and Radishes

Szigeti Pinot Noir Rosé Brut 2012

Dinner

Champagne Laurent-Perrier Brut NV

Summer Solstice > Roasted Beets with Apple Tapioca, Cauliflower Pudding, Orange, Fennel Granita, Buttermilk, and Rye Crisps

Kuentz-Bas Pinot Gris 2014

Steamed and Ramp-Crusted Sea Bass with Tokyo Turnips, Rhubarb Chutney, Jalapeño Ash, and Purslane

Château Ducasse Bordeaux Blanc 2016

Aged Duck Breast with Fava Bean Risotto, Morels, Apricot Purée, Celery Root Crumble, Spruce, and Onion Caramel

Chestnut Griddle Cakes with Cinnamon&ndashFoie Gras Butter, Blueberry Compote, Almond Crunch, Woodruff, and Vanilla Yogurt Sorbet

Château Laribotte Sauternes 2011

Kumquat Tart with Caramelized White Chocolate, Ginger Beer, Raspberry Glass, and Violet Ice Cream

Wines generously provided by Kelsey Lullo, C.S.

Tickets to events held at the James Beard House cover the cost of food and a unique dining experience. Dinners are prepared by culinary masters from all regions of the United States and around the world. All alcoholic beverages are provided on a complimentary basis and are not included in the ticket price.


The Bitten Word

For many people, mashed potatoes are a non-negotiable part of the Thanksgiving menu. Their place on the table isn't up for debate: No mashed potatoes, no Thanksgiving.

It's easy to understand why. Creamy, buttery mashed potatoes are a warm and welcome part of the feast.

But let's all be honest here. Let's call a spade a spade. At Thanksgiving, mashed potatoes serve one purpose, and one purpose only: Gravy-vehicle.

They don't really taste like anything, except the butter and salt and pepper you add to them. Sometimes we think they're really only there because it's considered impolite to eat gravy with a spoon, straight outta the gravy boat.

But what if you had a mash that actually brought something to the table? A root-vegetable mash that actually had flavor?

What if you had this Celery Root, Kohlrabi, and Apple Purée?

One of the greatest things about cooking -- at Thanksgiving as well as throughout the year -- is taking simple, sometimes homely-looking ingredients and combining them into something special and beautiful.

This recipe does that in aces. Because, uh, have you ever seen celery root and kohlrabi? Let's just say they're not the prettiest girls at the dance. 

Celery root and kohlrabi. Look away. LOOK AWAY!!

The recipe for this mash is simple: Peel and dice all the vegetables, boil until tender, purée until smooth. Yeah, it's a lot of dicing, but that's essentially the only work you have to do. 

We followed the recipe exactly, dutifully boiling one vegetable at a time, fishing it out, and then boiling the next one. We're not 100 percent sure that's necessary -- wouldn't it be fine to throw them all in a big pot of water and then drain and purée the whole thing? Must you really cook the apples in their own separate saucepan? It's up to you.

Also, we don't have a potato ricer or a food mill. Instead, we simply puréed this in our food processor. It worked just fine. In fact, we actually loved the slightly lumpy texture we ended up with.

This is one of those heaven-sent Thanksgiving recipes that you can make in its entirety a day ahead and then reheat in the microwave just before dinner. That's an excellent way to help reduce the T-day stress-factor. (It also makes this purée ideal if you need to take something to a potluck Thanksgiving dinner.)

The result? Deeeeelicious. It's like mashed potatoes with zing! The celery root and kohlrabi have an earthy flavor somewhat akin to a turnip, and the apple adds a little note that's sweet and a little tart. All in all, it's a very tasty mash. (And, yes, it went great with our gravy.)

Several of our dinner guests told us this purée was the best thing on the menu. When's the last time somebody said that about mashed potatoes? 

2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 3/4” cubes
Kosher salt
1 1/2 pounds kohlrabi, peeled, cut into 1/2” cubes
1 pound russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 1” cubes
1 Granny Smith apple (1/2 lb.), peeled, cored, cut into 1” cubes
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter
Freshly ground black pepper
Fresh chervil sprigs

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: A potato ricer or food mill

Add celery root to a large pot of boiling salted water. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until tender, 11–13 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer celery root to a large bowl. Return water to a boil repeat with kohlrabi, then potatoes, cooking each separately until tender, 14–16 minutes for kohlrabi and 10–12 minutes for potatoes add to bowl with celery root.

Meanwhile, bring apple and 2 Tbsp. water to a boil in a small saucepan. Cover and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until apple falls apart, 6–8 minutes, adding water by tablespoons if dry.

Working in batches, pass celery root, kohlrabi, potatoes, and apples through a potato ricer into a large bowl. Pass mixture through ricer again if a smoother texture is desired. Stir in butter. Season with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Transfer to a microwave-safe bowl, cover, and chill. Rewarm in microwave in 30-second intervals until heated through. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Garnish with chervil sprigs.


Culinary Nutrition Guide to Root Vegetables

Carrots

Image: Pexels from Pixabay

Flavour Profile: Sweet.

Key Health Benefits: Carrots contain antioxidant nutrients called carotenoids that help support vision, liver health and immunity, and they have anti-cancer properties.

Recipe to Try: Vegan Cashew Carrot Ginger Soup by Sondi Bruner (*Academy of Culinary Nutrition Head Program Coach)

Parsnips

Image: Ulrike Leone from Pixabay

Flavour Profile: Similar to carrots (they’re often called the blonde carrot), but a little earthier.

Key Health Benefits: In addition to its wealth of fibre and Vitamin C, parsnips contain potassium, an electrolyte mineral that keeps us hydrated and supports cardiovascular health.

Recipe to Try: Parsnip Cumin Soup by Jessica Mitton (*Culinary Nutrition Expert)

Sweet Potato

Flavour Profile: Very sweet, candy-like when mashed or roasted.

Key Health Benefits: Sweet potatoes are considered a staple crop in many places because they contain so many nutrients, including carotenoids that support eye health, Vitamin C for immunity, anti-inflammatory compounds, and a wealth of antioxidants like anthocyanins. They are low glycemic, aid digestion and some research on animals show that they can even trigger digestive enzymes.

Recipe to Try: Sweet Potato Lentil Goulash by Candra Reynolds (*Culinary Nutrition Expert)

Beets

Flavour Profile: Some describe beets as having a ‘dirt like’ flavour, but we find them very sweet.

Key Health Benefits: Beets contain betalain pigments, which are responsible for their bright colours and offer us anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and detoxifying health benefits. They are also helpful for PMS symptoms.

Recipe to Try: Golden Beet + Berry Salad by Jessica Pecush (*Culinary Nutrition Expert)

Celery Root (Celeriac)

Image: Wolfgang Eckert from Pixabay

Flavour Profile: Celery-like, mild, sweet and nutty – some also describe it as having undertones of parsley.

Key Health Benefits: Celery root is a great source of Vitamin K, which supports our bone health and prevents blood clots.

Recipe to Try: Vegan Celery Root and Apple Soup by Meghan Telpner (*Academy of Culinary Nutrition Founder + Director)

Turnips

Image: bvoyles4 from Pixabay

Flavour Profile: Cabbage-like, slightly sweet, can be slightly bitter depending on the variety.

Key Health Benefits: Turnips are also a member of the cruciferous family, so they contain compounds called glucosinolates and isothiocyanates that have anti-tumor and anti-cancer properties, and help protect the liver and kidneys.

Recipe to Try: Roasted Turnips and Pears by It’s a Veg World After All

Kohlrabi

Image: utroja0 from Pixabay

Flavour Profile: Slightly sweet, cabbage-like and broccoli-like.

Key Health Benefits: Kohlrabi has anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties, can help prevent colon and prostate cancer, and is rich in minerals like calcium, iron, potassium and magnesium.

Recipe to Try: Kohlrabi Fritters by Ful-Filled

Rutabaga

Flavour Profile: Rutabagas are a cross of cabbage and turnip, so they have a mild cabbage-turnip flavour.

Key Health Benefits: Rich in antioxidants and have a very strong ability to inhibit and destroy cancer cells.

Recipe to Try: Mashed Rutabaga with Spinach by Suzy Larsen (*Culinary Nutrition Expert)

Radish

Image: PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay

Flavour Profile: It depends on the variety – they may be sharp and spicy, or mild and sweet.

Key Health Benefits: Anti-diabetic and anti-fungal properties, and they contain glucosinolates, which help to prevent cancer.

Recipe to Try: Rainbow Celebration Salad by Angela Simpson (*Culinary Nutrition Expert)

Potato

Image: Monica Grabkowska from UnSplash

Flavour Profile: Mild and creamy.

Key Health Benefits: Potatoes have been forsaken in the health world due to their higher glycemic index and because they are usually eaten as junk food (potato chips, French fries, etc.). Emerging research lauds potatoes for their vitamin and mineral content (especially B vitamins) and a specific carbohydrate called resistant starch, which can aid digestion by feeding the beneficial bacteria in the gut and help with sleep. Potatoes that have been boiled and cooled are higher in resistant starch.

Recipe to Try: Herbed Potato Salad by Cookie and Kate

Horseradish

Flavour Profile: Spicy and peppery.

Key Health Benefits: Highly anti-inflammatory, boosts circulation and blood flow, clears the sinuses and has anti-cancer properties due to its content of glucosinolates,

Recipe to Try: Fire Cider by Academy of Culinary Nutrition

Ginger

Flavour Profile: Spicy.

Recipe to Try: Energizing Pineapple Anti-Inflammatory Smoothie by Carla Matthews (*Culinary Nutrition Expert)

Onion and Garlic

Image: Thomas Martinsen from Pixabay

Flavour Profile: Can be very pungent, bitter or spicy depending on the type of onions and garlic used – some onions like shallot or green onion are milder.

Recipe to Try: Vegan Leek and Onion Frittata by Vancouver with Love

Image: iStock/carlosgaw

More Wisdom from our Experts

Broths and Stocks: A Culinary Nutrition Guide

Broths and stocks are staples in kitchens in many parts of the world because they provide an abundance of flavour and nutrition to a variety…

Culinary Nutrition Chocolate Guide: What To Do With a Whole Cocoa Bean

At the Academy of Culinary Nutrition, we love our naturally sweetened treats – and there are few things we enjoy more than a healthy dose of…

Guide to Dark Leafy Greens + How to Use Them

Dark leafy greens are a true workhorse of the vegetable world: they contain a payload of nutrients that support good health, including antioxidants, healthy fats,…

Your Guide to Culinary Adaptogens

The world can be a stressful place: work, family, relationships, health, education, politics and finances are just some of the common troubles that can keep…

Your Ultimate Guide to Winter Squash

When the days grow shorter and the onset of winter becomes unavoidable, many people mourn the loss of colorful fruits and vegetables of the summertime…

Guide to Medicinal Mushrooms: Types, Best Uses and Recipes

Once the domain of psychedelic hippies, medicinal mushrooms have now hit the mainstream health, wellness and culinary spheres. This diverse group of plants – there…


A Classic, Revisited

Since 1936, Oliver&rsquos has captivated Buffalo&rsquos dining denizens thanks to a steady stream of extraordinary talent in the kitchen. Now, after a recent renovation and revamped menu by Nickel City rising star Ross Warhol, this culinary landmark continues to shine through sophisticated, artfully presented plates.

Click here to view photos from the event.

Hors d&rsquoOeuvre

Chicken Liver Toasts with Shaved Celery, Red Grapes, Ramson Capers, Chicken Skin, and Chervil

Oysters with Celery Gin, Black Currants, Spirulina, and Lemon Balm

Mushroom Tortellini with Pickled Kohlrabi, Foie Gras Demi-Glace, Truffles, and Nasturtium

Blue Cheesecake Tarts with Concord Grapes, Walnuts, and Radishes

Szigeti Pinot Noir Rosé Brut 2012

Dinner

Champagne Laurent-Perrier Brut NV

Summer Solstice > Roasted Beets with Apple Tapioca, Cauliflower Pudding, Orange, Fennel Granita, Buttermilk, and Rye Crisps

Kuentz-Bas Pinot Gris 2014

Steamed and Ramp-Crusted Sea Bass with Tokyo Turnips, Rhubarb Chutney, Jalapeño Ash, and Purslane

Château Ducasse Bordeaux Blanc 2016

Aged Duck Breast with Fava Bean Risotto, Morels, Apricot Purée, Celery Root Crumble, Spruce, and Onion Caramel

Chestnut Griddle Cakes with Cinnamon&ndashFoie Gras Butter, Blueberry Compote, Almond Crunch, Woodruff, and Vanilla Yogurt Sorbet

Château Laribotte Sauternes 2011

Kumquat Tart with Caramelized White Chocolate, Ginger Beer, Raspberry Glass, and Violet Ice Cream

Wines generously provided by Kelsey Lullo, C.S.

Tickets to events held at the James Beard House cover the cost of food and a unique dining experience. Dinners are prepared by culinary masters from all regions of the United States and around the world. All alcoholic beverages are provided on a complimentary basis and are not included in the ticket price.


Very Versatile Baked Beans with Cabbage

  • 1 pound dried medium or large beans, soaked at least 4 hours in plenty of water, drained
  • 11 garlic cloves, 5 smashed, 6 sliced
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 6 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 medium white onions, thinly sliced, or a combination of onions and fennel bulbs (about 3 cups)
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 medium head savoy cabbage, cored, cubed (about 8 cups)
  • 1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes
  • 1 bunch parsley, dill, or cilantro, finely chopped

Cover beans, smashed garlic, and bay leaves with about 1″ water in a large pot. Add 3 Tbsp. oil. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and bring to a simmer. Cover pot partially and cook, adding more hot water as needed to keep beans covered, until beans are nearly done. Add large pinches of salt to taste toward end of cook time, which will vary depending on the bean start tasting after about 30 minutes. Remove from heat and cover.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Heat remaining 3 Tbsp. oil in a Dutch oven or large ovenproof dish over medium-high. Add onions, red pepper, and 1/2 tsp. salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are reduced and beginning to caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add sliced garlic and cook until golden brown, about 5 minutes more. Add wine and cook until slightly reduced, about 1 minute. Add cabbage and cook until softened, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, crushing with a wooden spoon or cutting with scissors into coarse chunks. Add beans and their liquid, then cover with water until beans and vegetables are just submerged season to taste with salt. Bring to a boil, cover, and transfer to oven.

Bake beans 1 hour and 20 minutes. Uncover and continue to bake until liquid is slightly reduced and beans are completely tender, 15–30 minutes more. Let cool slightly to thicken, then stir in parsley just before serving.


What is Kohlrabi?

Kohlrabi is also known as Cabbage Turnip, German Turnip, Turnip Cabbage, Chou-rave (French), Couve rabano (Portuguese).

It’s a biennial vegetable, grown for its sweet, crunchy and bulbous, turniplike stem which is eaten raw or cooked. The swollen stem is usually pale green but purple varieties are also cultivated and marketed.

The leafy greens with long stalks grow directly from the swollen bulb. They are also edible and can be cooked much like Kale or Collard greens.

Kohlrabi is a cultivated variety of the wild cabbage, Brassica oleracea and is usually classified in the Brassica oleracea L., Gongylodes Group.

The name Kohlrabi from German Kohl’ which means cabbage plus Rube-Rabi-the Swiss German, for turnip, because the swollen stem resembles turnip.

Origin of kohlrabi

Kohlrabi originates in North western Europe, where it was developed from the marrow-stem kale, a fodder crop with thickened stems. Marrow stem kale is also a descendant of the wild cabbage.

Kohlrabi is adapted to temperate climate and is grown in North America, temperate parts of Asia and subtropical Asia (India, China, Northern Vietnam). It’s best grown in spring, fall or in winter in areas where hard freezes don’t occur.

Kohlrabi Stem

The bulbous stem is mostly light green or sometimes purple, on the outside, but the edible portion is Ivory (off white) in colour. The flesh has a texture similar to that of a broccoli stem, but with a flavour that is sweeter and less vegetal. The young stems are crisp and juicy like an apple but less sweet.

Kohlrabi is rich in vitamin C and fibre, and low in calories. 100g (3.5oz) portion provides 75% of the daily recommended vitamin C and only 27 calories.

Preparation and use of Kholrabi

  1. Kohlrabi bulb is surrounded by two distinct fibrous layers that do not soften well when cooked. These fibrous layers should be peeled with a sharp knife, prior to cooking or serving raw.
  2. The peeling of the thick layers often reduces the edible part, appreciably. After peeling you can chop, slice, grate, julienne or cut into matchsticks depending on the recipe you plan to use.
  3. The leafy greens can be cooked like collard greens or kale. The bulbs can be cooked like root vegetables, or added to soups, risottos and stews.

What size is best for cooking?

In general, younger kohlrabi are more tender, while older kohlrabi tend to be woody.

Spring-grown kohlrabi over 5cm in diameter tend to be woody
Fall-grown kohlrabi over 10cm in diameter, are also woody.

The cultivar ‘Superschmelz’, from Switzerland, produces giant 10-inch diameter bulbs, weighing almost 5kg (10Ib), and remain tender and sweet unlike other giant kohlrabi.

Here is my favourite you-tube video on how to prepare and cook kohlrabi I hope you enjoy watching it!

Other varieties:

There are several varieties commonly available, including ‘White Vienna’, ‘Purple Vienna’, ‘Grand Duke’, Gigante (also known as “Superschmelz”), ‘Purple Danube’, and ‘White Danube’.
Some varieties are grown as feed for cattle

Culinary Use

  1. Kohlrabi is common cuisine in German speaking countries, where it’s frequently used raw in salad or slaws. It’s best cut into matchsticks.
  2. Kohlrabi is also an important part of the Kashmiri diet and one of the most commonly cooked foods. It is prepared with its leaves and served with a light gravy and eaten with rice.
  3. It’s also used in soups and stews or roasted like other root vegetables.
  4. Industrially, it’s made into deep frozen products.

How to Buy Kohlrabi

  1. If you can, buy bulbs that still have their leaves attached. This will give you a better indication of freshness, because the leaves wilt faster than the bulbs.
  2. Buy bulbs that feel heavy for their size and have firm and tight skins.
  3. Kohlrabi is available all year round, peaking in spring

How to store Kohlrabi

  1. You should always remove the leaves from the bulb and store them separately.
  2. The leaves should be kept in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge and used within a few days.
  3. Unpeeled bulbs will last in the fridge crisper for weeks.

Growing Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi should be harvested when young (55–65 days after sowing) as the tuber becomes woody and fibrous with age.

To obtain a tender, sweet product from spring-sown kohlrabi the stem tubers are picked when 5–6cm in diameter

Autumn-grown kohlrabi are less likely to become fibrous and can be harvested when 10–12 cm in diameter.


Side dishes and salads

Winter vegetables are so versatile as hot or cold side dishes. You can roast them, make a refreshing slaw, or even purée them to serve as a buttery mashed potato alternative. Yum!

Easy Roasted Winter Vegetables

This sheet pan side dish is super easy and quick to prepare, but fancy enough for guests. Hearty sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and purple potatoes are the stars, and the recipe is jazzed up with the addition of dried cranberries and candied pecans.

by Simple Healthy Kitchen – get the full recipe here

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Butternut Squash With Medjool Dates

One of my favorite recipes with winter vegetables is this easy Brussels sprouts and butternut squash side dish. It’s made with clean ingredients: healthy oils, salt and pepper, and a tiny bit of added sweetness from the dates.

Think you don’t like Brussels sprouts? This recipe will change your mind! Roasting the sprouts until they caramelize and just begin to char removes any bitterness from the veggies and turns them nutty-sweet.

It’s even Whole30 compliant, paleo, gluten-free, dairy-free, and vegan.

Warm Winter Vegetable Salad

Salads are often served cold, but why not try a warm salad in the winter? Packed with winter vegetables, quinoa, and leafy greens, serve this salad to accompany your meal and save the leftovers for lunch. The creamy yogurt-based dressing is a cool accompaniment to the warm roasted veggies.

Winter Root Vegetable Purée

Do you love mashed potatoes as much as I do? They’re my favorite comfort food, but creamy, buttery mashed potatoes can be so high calorie. Try some different root vegetables for a lighter version of mash! This recipe combines turnips, parsnips, and celery root—packed with so much flavor you won’t need to add all that butter.

Winter Vegetable Slaw with Easy Citrus Vinaigrette

Sometimes I crave a cooler, lighter salad, even in the winter. This citrusy slaw uses winter vegetables including two types of cabbage, kale, and carrots. Shred it up fast in your food processor, and mix it with the citrusy vinaigrette for a little taste of summer in the wintertime.


Grated Raw Beet Salad

People who swear they hate beets love this salad. It’s a North African-inspired mixture of grated, uncooked beets dressed with orange and lemon juices and a small amount of olive oil. It makes a great starter when you’re serving something robust as a main course, like a couscous.

  • 1/2 pound beets
  • 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoon minced chives, mint or parsley (or a combination)
  • Salt to taste
  • Leaves of 1 romaine heart
  1. Peel the beets with a vegetable peeler, and grate in a food processor fitted with the shredding blade.
  2. Combine the orange juice, lemon juice and olive oil. Toss with the beets and herbs. Season to taste with salt. Line a salad bowl or platter with romaine lettuce leaves, top with the grated beets and serve.

Yield: Serves four.

Advance preparation: The grated beets can be dressed and kept in the refrigerator, covered well, for a couple of days. They become more tender but don’t lose their texture, and the mixture becomes even sweeter as the beet juices mingle with the citrus. Toss again before serving.



Comments:

  1. Kamden

    Between us, I would turn to search engines for help.

  2. Vigore

    I am sorry that I can not help you with anything, but I am sure that they will help you find the right solution.

  3. Scully

    Bravo, this magnificent phrase is necessary just by the way



Write a message